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Educational Institutions Have A Responsibility To Dissuade Students From Pursuing Fields Of Study In Which They Are Unlikely To Succeed. - With Free Essay Review



Educational Institutions Have A Responsibility To Dissuade Students From Pursuing Fields Of Study In Which They Are Unlikely To Succeed.

“Write a response in which you discuss the extent to which you agree or disagree with the claim. In developing and supporting your position, be sure to address the most compelling reasons and/or examples that could be used to challenge your position.”

Educational institutions primarily play roles in providing formal education and helping students be prepared for their future careers. Thus, I disagree with the statement that educational institutions have a responsibility to dissuade students from pursuing fields of study in which they are unlikely to succeed, because I think for such an important decision, students should be responsible for the fields they choose to pursue regardless of the likelihood of success. Further, dissuading students from pursuing fields in which they are unlikely to succeed, may encourage students to voluntarily accept their limitations even without trying, and in fact, most people who succeed in any field, have failed many times before their successes.

First of all, I think dissuading students from pursuing fields in which they are unlikely to succeed may encourage students to accept their limitations before they actually try. It is true that some students may not show any talents in fields they are interested in, and educational instituitions may consider that they are unlikely to succeed in these fields. Then, should we dissuade a student, who wants to be a pianist, from going to professional music schools because he does not show any talent? If so, this can not only hurt the student’s feeling, but also encourage the student to give up before he even tries. This is not fair for students, who may not show any talents, or are considered unlikely to succeed. They should have equal opportunities to pursue fields they are interested in.

In addition, many people, even the ones are considered talented or likely to succeed, may fail many times in fields of study before they succeed. Thus, I think pursuing fields of study in which students are unlikely to succeed should be justifiable, because in many cases, people can succeed not because they seem to be likely to succeed; instead, it is because they fail at the first time, but do not give up, and keep trying over and over again until they succeed. Therefore, educational institutions should not dissuade students from pursuing fields they are unlikely to succeed because numerous successful people fail many times before they succeed.

One the other hand, I think educational institutions should objectively inform students of the likelihood of success. Sometimes, students may underestimate difficulties of certain fields, and in this case, educational institutions should help students understand what they are trying to do, and how competitive that can be. Furthermore, imagine students spend years in colleges studying fields they are unlikely to succeed, and schools invest teaching resources and efforts to help these students, does this do any good to the society? It might be a better use to money, efforts, and time to help students pursuing fields they are more likely to succeed.

Overall, I think educational institutions do not have a responsibility to disuade students from pursuing fields they are unlikely to succeed because this can discourage students to challenge, and encourage them to give up even without trying. In addition, this is not fair for students who do not show any talents.

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Essay Review

This essay starts out pretty well, identifying at least one good reason for disagreeing with the given statement (it's unfair), and clarifying that reason quite well. Note that the prompt asks you "to address the most compelling reasons and/or examples that could be used to challenge your position." Most people who respond to this instruction (many either don't respond or respond only briefly) postpone their response until after they have made the positive case for their own position. Considering possible objections to specific arguments that you make while you are making them is also an option, and often the better one. In this case, for example, it might be useful to consider a possible objection to your argument that dissuading students would be unfair to them. (Might it not be argued that it is equally unfair not to dissuade the talentless aspiring pianist? It might be unfair to the student himself, to the teacher, or to peers.)

Your second argument is based on the premise that "numerous successful people fail many times before they succeed" but essentially it seems to boil down to the claim that a student should not be dissuaded from pursuing fields in which they are unlikely to succeed because they might actually succeed. You devote your effort here to demonstrating why you think some might actually succeed, but more important than that, I think, would be to explain why, given the fact that "unlikely to succeed" doesn't mean "certain to fail," which seems in any case to go without saying, why that is a sufficient difference to justify not dissuading students who are unlikely to succeed. Your only argument in that regard is the prior argument that it would be unfair. Logically, then, I think your third paragraph should precede your second paragraph. It makes sense, in other words, to claim first that students who are "unlikely to succeed" may nonetheless succeed, and then claim, as a consequence, that it would be unfair to dissuade them.

Your next paragraph is a little bit off-topic, in that you are focused on explaining what you think educational institutions should do. Note that it would make sense to do this, up to a point, in the context of defending your claim that it is unfair to dissuade certain students. I.e., you might argue that it is more fair to let students try to pursue what they want to pursue only if educational institutions inform such students of the likelihood of success.

Your main focus here, however, should again be on addressing possible objections. You indirectly raise a possible objection by inviting your reader to imagine the waste that might be involved when a student pursues courses in which they are unlikely to succeed. But you merely admit the legitimacy of that objection, and thus leave the reader unsure of why you claim to disagree with the original statement. Presumably you think the question of fairness is more important than the problem of wasted resources and time, but you need to make that point explicit.

Best, EJ.
Submitted by: uofr6460
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