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Students Should Always Question What They Are Taught Instead Of Accepting It Passively. - With A Free Essay Review.



Instructions: ”Write a response in which you discuss the extent to which you agree or disagree with the statement and explain your reasoning for the position you take. In developing and supporting your position, you should consider ways in which the statement might or might not hold true and explain how these considerations shape your position.”

The statement suggests that students should be critical with numerous questions all the time rather than being receptive to all the knowledge blindly. To a large degree, I agree that critical thinking promotes innovation and creates momentum for knowledge evolution, and hence is undoubtedly vital to the learning process. Yet, passive learning process should never be neglected for preparing students with basic knowledge especially at starting stage.

All the learning processes begin with basic knowledge transfer, a stage turning students to be generally knowledgeable and preparing building blocks for the other in-depth study. At this stage, students should focus on learning without too much critics. Being skeptical of all the information received interrupts this learning process. If a student overspends time to question basic axioms such as why one plus one equals two, and given no one can prove it so far, he may start to question the whole knowledge system built on the “unconvincing axioms”. And a learning process filled with disbelief is ineffective and hard to provide a sustainable knowledge foundation for further study. In fact, no one can guarantee everything in their knowledge base is absolutely right. Questioning is not to bring a perfect end to learning process, but to open more possibilities to a better understanding. Withholding the questions and being tolerant with the potential errors learned from this receptive stage will leave us a broader platform to improve our knowledge.

Beyond the initiative knowledge acquisition stage, questions become valuable. Skepticism inspires students to think critically, reviewing every piece of assumptions and inference reflectively to challenge and to be closer to the truth. This process is very necessary in social science fields such as law and economy given its ever-changing studying objects. Law school students, for example, on one hand learn to appreciate the enduring spirit of law and its elemental legal principles; on the other hand, have to continuously question the adhesiveness of current legal provisions to the underlying doctrine. Similarly, the economic students, realizing the beauty of monetary and financial policies, can never forget potential side effects uncovered by new market environment when justify the contemporary economic policy. Societies evolve in a way with ever-changing societal values. Correspondingly, social sciences should adjust the specific contents to reflect the emerging concepts. Skepticism inspires the students to challenge the out-dated knowledge and proactively seek solution to refine current knowledge framework.

Critical think is even more important in natural scientific fields. After picking up the building blocks from passive learning, any further continuation at best will only lead to various permutation and combination of available knowledge. Skepticism on the other hand, leads to innovation and invention, encouraging discovering endeavor towards breakthrough. Take astronomy as example, every historical evolution of its progress involves challenges to existing limited knowledge. By questioning the rightness of the earth-centric universe, Copernicus established his heliocentric model to demonstrate the observations of celestial motions that cannot be explained without putting the Sun at the universe center. He later successfully initiated the starting point of modern astronomy, paving ways for Kepler’s celestial physics, even casting influence on Newton’s theory of universal gravitation. This confounding achievement arises from the skepticism of what has been taught is a substantiate illustration of the value of critical thinking.

To sum up, skepticism is the indispensable momentum pushing forward the progressions of the all the science fields: math, physics, astronomy, law, economy and etc. We should advocate critical thinking in most cases, but respect passive learning serving important role at the basic level of knowledge accumulation.

The arguments that you advance here are all pretty reasonable, so I'm afraid I've not much to offer you in a review. The only argument I have a minor quiblle with is the last one (with the Copernicus example) and that only because it is not explicitly related to question of what students should do; it would be easy to explicitly inform your reader why Copernicus's approach is one that students should emulate.

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ESSAY REVIEW

The arguments that you advance here are all pretty reasonable, so I'm afraid I've not much to offer you in a review. The only argument I have a minor quiblle with is the last one (with the Copernicus example) and only because it is not explicitly related to question of what students should do; it would be easy to explicitly inform your reader why Copernicus's approach is one that students should emulate.

The significant problem with your essay is the number of language errors (grammar, syntax, word choice). When these kinds of errors are not too many in number and occur in argumentatively simple essays, they often do not heavily impact the intelligibility of the writing. Your arguments tend to be built up over the course of several sentences, however. A complex argument with a number of distinct claims is much more liable to produce confusion in the reader if there are language errors. I'm not sure there is much you can do about this in the short term. The complexity of the argument is the most important feature of an essay, so you certainly can’t sacrifice that. It may help to try to keep your vocabulary and syntax simple, and your sentences short; short sentences are less prone to error. It probably will help a little to be boringly explicit about how your "considerations" "shape your position."

For example, instead of: "This confounding achievement arises from the skepticism of what has been taught is a substantiate illustration of the value of critical thinking."

Write: "This achievement arose because Copernicus was skeptical of what had been taught. It illustrates the value of critical thinking. For this reason, I agree that advanced students should question what they are taught."

The last sentence here is the boringly explicit part. It tells your reader that you know exactly what you are saying. There are less boring ways to communicate that to your reader, but this is a good, safe way for an exam situation.

Finally, don't have errors that you can avoid by proofreading.

Best, EJ.
Submitted by: sicong
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Comments
Sicong
+1

Thanks a lot EJ, I will keep that in mind and work hard to find the shortcut way to write it for the exam. On the other hand, keep practicing even after exam to improve the real writing basic skills.
July,03 2012

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